Health Hazards In The Home

There are many potential hazards to health in and around the home including many hazards we quite simply overlook.

Among those that are easily overlooked are health hazards. Health hazards in the home can range from mold and fungus because of untreated dampness to asbestos and glass fiber, both of which are extremely dangerous to respiratory systems, and many others which we identify in this article. There is, in fact, a fairly long list of environmental hazards to human health that, if we are not alert to them, can be a challenge to healthcare in the home and a threat to our families.

Health Hazards List

The most common health hazards found in our homes include:

  • Mold – mold and pests can trigger or cause asthma symptoms
  • Vermin
  • Cockroaches
  • Fungus
  • Poisons for eliminating pests
  • Animal Feces
  • Dog Urine
  • Corrosive Chemicals
  • Toxic Chemicals
  • Carbon Monoxide
  • Radon
  • Asbestos
  • Glass fiber
  • Smoking
  • Vaping
  • Gas appliances
  • Inflammable liquids
  • Medications
  • Drugs (other than Meds)
  • Hoarding – fire risk
  • Hoarding – health risks; tripping, falling, and tipping
  • Sharp blades, edges and corners; anything that can cut, gash or gouge.

Checking for any and all of these items is simply a great place to start, and then to take action and clean up, dispose of, eliminate, or properly store as appropriate for each type of health hazard found.

Reminder List:

  • Leaky batteries, alkaline batteries whether re-chargeable or not are full of toxic chemicals. Leaving old batteries lying around waiting to be properly disposed of are a potentially serious hazard to babies. An old leaky car battery, even if in the workshop or garage, is a potential danger to anyone coming in contact with the acid that is the battery as it can cause serious skin burns.
  • Out-of-date medications that are in the medicine cabinet are probably less than fully effective at best and could be a serious danger to young children or even adults if taken inappropriately.
  • Out-of-date food can cause food poisoning. This statement might not apply to all food types but any food that has deteriorated can present a risk.
  • Unclean cooking utensils are often the cause of food poisoning. All cooking utensils should be thoroughly cleaned and rinsed completely clean of washing up soaps or chemicals after use, and if necessary (if appearing to be less than thoroughly clean) before being used. While not usually life-threatening, the effects of food poisoning caused by contamination from less-than-fully clean cooking utensils, can be inconvenient and even be quite painful.
  • Unclean eating utensils. Eating utensils – forks, spoons, and knives – that are used to either prepare food or used to eat with should be thoroughly cleaned and rinsed completely clean of washing up soaps or chemicals after use, and if necessary (if appearing to be less than thoroughly clean) before being used.

Home Safety Tips Checklist

In the post ‘Home Safety Tips Checklists‘ there are two printable checklists of safety tips; one for inside the home (indoors) and the other for the yard and garden (outdoors). Some of the items referenced here are included in that post, but not all. The list included in this page is more of a complement to the Home Safety Tips Checklists that an extract or a duplicate.

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